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Christian Science in the news

Below are articles in the news primarily written by Christian Science Committees on Publication. Please support the Press Room by sharing these articles.

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On Faith Panel
The Washington Post, January 21, 2010; 1:24 PM ET

Q: Many have criticized Pat Robertson’s suggestion that the catastrophic earthquake in Haiti was the work of the devil or a form of divine punishment. But if one believes God is good and intervenes in the world, why does God allow innocents to suffer? What is the best scriptural text or explanation of that problem you’ve ever read?

By Phil Davis, Manager, Christian Science Committees on Publication

When seeing the unimaginable suffering in Haiti right now, I think it just makes matters so much worse to think that God had something to do with this or somehow allowed it to happen.

On Faith Panel
The Washington Post, December 24, 2009; 4:11 PM ET

Q: What was the most important religion story of 2009?

By Phil Davis, Manager, Christian Science Committees on Publication

I’m very curious about which of the many good stories for 2009 my contributing colleagues will focus on.

Reporter Katharine Seelye of the The New York Times recently wrote an article titled, “To a Divisive Debate, Now Add Religion“. During the interview, she asked me if I think spirituality is related to health. I shared with her how deeply connected spirituality and health are in my experience, and in that of many others. Here are some more people who want to share their own accounts of spiritual healing in Christian Science.

On Dec. 4, 2009, The Boston Globe published a letter to the editor titled “Healthy Thanks to Christian Science (Feds Take Note).” We thought it was a clear message that should be captured on video. See what you think.

Reporter Katharine Seelye of the The New York Times recently wrote an article titled, “To a Divisive Debate, Now Add Religion“. During the interview, she asked me if I think spirituality is related to health. I shared with her how deeply connected spirituality and health are in my experience, and in that of many others.

The New York Times, December 5, 2009; 4:49 PM ET
By Katharine Q. Seelye

Should health insurance companies cover prayer as a legitimate medical expense?

Please see my guest column in the The Washington Post’s On Faith section: Pluralism includes spiritual health care

ON Faith Guest Voices
The Washington Post, November 30, 2009; 5:14 PM ET

By Phil Davis, Manager, Christian Science Committees on Publication

One of the best parts of my job is seeing my religion through the eyes of the journalists I talk with. I learn a lot from our conversations. The reporters and editors are frank with me, probing, and in most cases equally open to seeing things from my perspective.

Conversation starters are tools of the trade in media relations work. In talking with a reporter the other day I saw how quickly just three words near the start of our conversation—pay for prayer—had the opposite effect. He couldn’t see why someone would do that—he’s not alone!—and we weren’t going to talk about anything else until that oddity was explained.

The reason this came up was because he’d seen a story in the Los Angeles Times about this Church’s efforts to have spiritual care included as a qualified expense in whatever health care reform legislation makes it into law.

William Wan at the Washington Post wrote an article containing some inaccuracies on Christian Science and our efforts in health care reform.  Contrary to the article, the Church is not advocating for tax dollars to be used for prayer.  The article also implies that the Church tells its members what form of healing to choose, however, Christian Scientists make their own decisions about health care.

The Washington Post, November 23, 2009
By William Wan, Staff Writer

The calls come in at all hours: patients reporting broken bones, violent coughs, deep depression.

Prue Lewis listens as they explain their symptoms. Then Lewis — a thin, frail-looking woman from Columbia Heights — simply says, “I’ll go to work right away.” She hangs up, organizes her thoughts and begins treating her clients’ ailments the best way she knows how: She prays.

Paul Tash is confidently playing the long game.

As the Editor, Chairman and CEO of a newspaper—the St. Petersburg Times—this may come as a surprise to some people. Newspapers have been talking a lot more about survival these days than about longevity. But not Tash.

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